What is Fret on Ukulele?

Although widely popular as an easy to play stringed instrument, it is highly necessary to know all the basics and parts of a ukulele before playing the notes. A fret is one of the very main parts of the instrument, that makes the instrument tune. The way your ukulele is going to sound greatly depends on the way you fret. If you are getting your head around playing a ukulele, today we present to you what a fret is on a ukulele.

The frets on a ukulele are the vertical pieces of metal that lay across the fret board, is a raised line which surrounds the neck of a ukulele. That is why frets are also known as the ‘neck’ of the instrument. The neck of the ukulele is connected to the body. The top side of the neck is considered the fretboard. At the highest point of the fretboard, the strings rest in the scores of the nut, which at that point join themselves in the tuners on the headstock. 

Players with a guitar background would be well familiar with frets, as it is a vital part of guitars too. Frets are exceedingly important parts of a ukulele, as these work as markers that assists to find notes on a fretboard. 

Fretboard:

In spite of the fact that it appears to be somewhat of a task, learning all the notes on your fretboard is so useful with regards to figuring out how to play ukulele. The capacity to quickly understand what note you’re playing any place you are on the neck on your ukulele opens up a wide range of conceivable outcomes and should begin to draw an obvious conclusion for you on which notes and harmonies cooperate and why.

The solid narrow piece of wood that is attached to the neck of a ukulele is the fret board. The thins strips of metal that run across the fretboard are the frets. It is basically the board where the frets are situated. Generally played with the left hand, the fretboard is as long in size as the neck of the front of the instrument. To produce a note or chord on your ukulele, you need to press the strings against the fretboard. 

How many frets does a Ukulele have? 

Ukuleles of different sizes and types have different number of frets on them. Characteristically, soprano ukuleles have 12-15 frets, whereas, it is not the same with other types of ukuleles. Concert ukuleles contain 15-20 frets due to its body being larger than soprano ukulele. As a result, it creates larger ranges of notes and fuller sound compared to the soprano ukuleles. A tenor ukulele has 15-22 frets and Baritones have at least 19 of them. 

Half- step between frets:

Each fret on a ukulele is just ‘half a step’, or only a half note away from each other. The notes in between are named using sharps (#) and flats (b). While a sharp is half a step up, a flat is half a step down.  For instance, a “Bb” (or “B flat”) is half a step down from the B note, but it still is not an A. Similarly, An “F#” (or “F sharp”) is half a step up from F, but not yet a G. 

Despite the half steps being depicted as either “sharp” or “flat,” they are fundamentally the same note. In other words, A# and Bb are actually the same note. A large portion of these notes will in general be portrayed more frequently by one name than the other; Bb is more normal than A# for instance. In any case, the two names are technically right.

Between notes B and C, or E and F, there is hardly any enharmonic notes (flats or sharps), which can be pretty bewildering. However, there is a simple technique to remember the difference, which is that B/C and E/F are always “neighbors.”

Also Read: Top 5 Best Concert Ukulele for Beginners in 2021

The 44 frets to memorize:

After you are done recalling the names/notes of the open strings, you need to get a hold on some of the names of different fretted notes you are going to play. The good news s that notes upto the eleventh fret are required to be known. When you hit the twelfth fret you will be an entire octave up and the notes rehash themselves beginning from GCEA

That is an astounding 44 frets (4 strings x 11 frets) that you need to learn. It will take a short while to get that rehearsed and memorized. Breaking it up into shorter chunks, beginning with the frets five and seven is a recommended way to achieve this. The magnificence of frets five and seven is that simply like the open strings, they do not include any sharps or flats. 

The notes at the 5th fret are C, F, A and D. At the 7th we have D, G, B and E. A trick to remember them is ‘Chickens Fight All Day’ (CFAD) and ‘Do not Go Breaking Everything’ (DGBE). It does not matter how you choose to remember it. All that matters is for you to get a way to stick to them.

Since these 8, and the already known 4 strings add up to 12, there are 32 more to go. There’s no brisk stunt that will compel the rest of the frets into your brain and keep them there. It is recommended to work on them in little lumps. When you have the open strings and frets 5 and 7 remembered, it should be adequately simple to include frets 1, 4, 6 and 8 as you have a reference point for every one of them, you definitely realize the notes close to them. 

Also Read: Top 5 Best Sounding Ukuleles in 2021

Conclusion:

It will require some time to get a hang of it, there is no denying that. With regular endeavors, however, you’ll be well headed to turning into a fretboard ace. Press down on the strings with shorter and higher pitch to produce different notes and you will be fretting in no time.

It will require some time to get a hang of it, there is no denying that. With regular endeavors, however, you’ll be well headed to turning into a fretboard ace. Press down on the strings with shorter and higher pitch to produce different notes and you will be fretting in no time.

Leave a Comment